Copyright: All artwork/content protected under ©2007-2011 Lynne Ciacco

All content herein copyright © Lynne Ciacco


Thursday, July 5, 2012

Postcard from Tropea

I felt like noodling in Photoshop tonight, especially as I haven't been working in my studio lately.  I took a quick look through my Calabria photos  and pulled out this one of a little corner we'd often stumble upon on our ramblings through the narrow alleyways of Tropea.


©2012 L.Ciacco, Tropea Corner, Digitally altered photograph

  Some of the upper dwellings seemed abandonned, or certainly neglected, with shutters broken or missing; but other apartamenti in this palazzo seemed well cared for, with their potted plants and lace curtains.  I was fascinated by the flat-topped tree that looked so much like an umbrella in the small courtyard below.  A week or so later, tables decked out with checkered cloths appeared beneath the tree and the place became a pizzeria.

(I used grunge brushes downloaded from the internet, as well as a texture from Shadowhouse Creations and a colour tint from the Coffeeshop Blog, as well as textures taken from my own Calabria Series).




Joining in with Photo Art Friday

50 comments:

  1. A grouping of places that seem inhabited but without any inhabitants visible conjours ideas of what might be happening within. Is there a compartmentalized separation from common areas of sharing? Loneliness? Suspicion.

    I would like to see the contrasting view of the area when lunch was being served with colour and laughter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DCW,
      Your scenario sounds worthy of a Polanski film.

      Alas, I don't have the contrasting view. In fact, in keeping with they mystery of the place, I never did see people sitting at the tables, enjoying pizza and wine while their laughter rang across the cobblestones.

      Delete
  2. Oh this is a Beaut!!!
    Couldn't you just imagine yourself living there... so darn romantic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gwen,
      Oh, so you like it, too! Imagine all the wonderful renos you could bring to bear on such a dwelling. Yes, indeedy--I certainly can picture myself living there.

      Delete
    2. oh Louciao.. I have to say if I am ever involved in another renovation, you have my complete permission to shoot me!!!

      Delete
    3. OK, Gwen. I guess we'll have to make a death pact. The romance of renovations has definitely worn off for me as well.

      Delete
  3. Beautiful photo, good capture and processing, pure poetry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Leovi,
      What a lovely description, "pure poetry." I am flattered. Thank you.

      Delete
  4. such a haunting picture. You have enhanced it so beautifully. It feels exotic and mysterious. A post card from the twenties. And how fascinating the various levels of habitation. And lastly, you can eat pizza there! What more could one ask.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sukipoet,
      I like how you've placed the feeling of the place in the twenties. When I was working on it I was having trouble imagining how others would see it; if I was pushing it too far--so I'm very happy that it translated as "exotic and mysterious" for you.

      Eating pizza makes just about everything all right, doesn't it.

      Delete
  5. Looks like, to me anyway, the Italian version of "The Best Exoctic Marigold Hotel", a
    movie that I loved.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shirl,
      Oh I love that comparison! Maybe I should look into setting up the Italian version. Can I sign you up as the first guest? Special family rates!

      Delete
  6. How romantic! You've set my imagination spinning!! Imagine the stories those balconies and that courtyard could tell. You certainly tell an intriguing one with your fab editing skills. Thank you for sharing this piece with Photo Art Friday, Lynne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bonnie,
      I was so pleased to discover the theme you set for this week's "exhibit" over on Pixel Dust as I just happened to have a piece that fit in perfectly. Haven't been doing much pixel-pushing lately and it felt good to be back in the saddle, wrangling those little beasties. "Fab editing skills"...heh heh heh...I guess trial and error could be called a technique. But I'll lap up the compliment!

      Delete
  7. Absolutely lovely what you have done with this! And such an atmosphere of mystery and art in this place. Very nice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jeanne,
      I'm so pleased you stopped by and liked what you saw! Would you like a piece of pizza?

      Delete
  8. great capture! and I can imagine your fascination as you wandered through Torpea

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deborah,
      I love the little typo in your comment, transforming Tropea into Torpea...which would be Italian for torpor, don't you think? It's a state that I understand overcomes much of southern Italy in the hot summer months. I'm certain you understand perfectly the fascination the place held for me, what with your writer's imagination and living where you do.

      Delete
  9. So very rustic and old world. Beautiful. Valerie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Valerie,
      Yes, I think "old world charm" really sums it up nicely. Thanks!

      Delete
  10. What a romantic-looking place, full of character! I love the enhancement your edit gives it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pat,
      Isn't it romantic! A perfect word to describe it.

      Delete
  11. Fabulous! What interesting buildings and foliage. That tree certainly is very unique looking. Love the Postcard edit you gave this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ida,
      I guess someone must have taken the time to train that tree...or I wonder now if it might be a grapevine.

      Delete
  12. i like what you did. beautiful work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John,
      Thanks so much. I'm glad you like what you saw and took the time to say so.

      Delete
  13. Many scenarios like this in Poland... ahh you made me miss my country even more.
    Beautiful work, these week!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Momphotog,
      I hope my picture made you miss your country in a good way...happy, fond memories rather than sadness. Your homeland must be very beautiful if it's full of scenes like this.

      Delete
    2. I am in very melancholic mood lately, and I miss my family and my hometown a lot. I wish I could go there more often and photograph those beautiful places!

      Delete
    3. I wish I could say it gets easier to live far from whom and what one loves from our beginnings. Aside from being able to visit from time to time, the best we can do is focus on what we love in the present.

      Delete
  14. This is simply stunning!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kim,
      Thanks for the encouragement, and for coming by to take a look.

      Delete
  15. I am absolutely drawn to this. Thanks for inspiring me to step out of the box a bit and experiment with digitally altering a photo...I'm more a SOOC person but this is truly art!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Danielle,
      I read a quote recently from choreographer Twyla Tharp to the effect that one has to have a box before one can step outside of it. So you're well on your way! Happy to have given you a nudge.

      Delete
  16. I love balconies like this in Southern Italy. Great painterly vintage effect!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Loredana,
      Oh, me too! Especially if they were decorated with pots of geraniums, or bedecked with laundry.

      Delete
  17. Now why can't we have a "grunge brush" in real life... I think I'd use it all the time before taking photos... rather than after...

    Yes, worlds of mysteries here behind those closed and broken shutters. Makes my mouth water... a slobbering toad you have inspired...

    So when are you going back there to sample the pizza ???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Owen,
      I think the in-camera equivalent is dirt on the lens.
      Is your mouth watering over the scene or the mention of pizza?
      I'd go back any time...though maybe not in winter. Those palazzi don't have central heating. Brrrr!

      Delete
  18. Absolutely gorgeous treatment. I love the character!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cherie,
      Doesn't the place fairly reek of character? What stories those walls could tell...

      Delete
  19. Wow,- this is just fantastic! Love it all!
    Have a nice weekend:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Monica,
      I do love hearing a "Wow" when someone drops in to visit my blog. Thanks!

      Delete
  20. I will add to the compliments by saying I will sign up for the hotel stay and be next in line!! I have never been to italy but Diane Lane could fix it up nicely as she did in "Tuscany" movie..I will take a few of pics of Spain and see if they are worth doctoring up like this...beautiful!

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    Replies
    1. Kkkkaty,
      Your room is reserved. It is near the kkkkitchen. I hope this will be OKKKK.

      Delete
  21. I love this postcard- it looks so like a vintage image! "Wish I was there!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sharmon,
      The scene itself felt vintage: I'm sure there were a lot of ghosts lingering there. I'm glad to hear my editing enhanced this impression.

      Delete
  22. Replies
    1. Anki-Itte,
      I'm happy that you do! Thanks for visiting.

      Delete
  23. Beautiful - looks like a piece of fine art. Well, it is, actually!!
    P.S. Thanks for the "no word verification"!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Marilyn,
    Oh,it is fun to make art digitally (as well you know!), however we choose to define it. I hate dealing with WVs myself.

    ReplyDelete