Copyright: All artwork/content protected under ©2007-2011 Lynne Ciacco

All content herein copyright © Lynne Ciacco


Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Medieval Collage--Les Demoiselles

Another in the ongoing Medieval Collage series.



created from torn-up calendars, art papers, wallpaper, and text from a vintage book page;
approximately 7.5 x 5 inches.

14 comments:

  1. these are beautiful- so well reassembled! how many do you plan to make?

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    1. The series is actually finished. I managed to make 15 in all before having to admit I'd run out of steam and had to throw all the luscious scraps away...which was the original point of the exercise. I was hoping to make 20, but couldn't find enough of the right sized figures to reassemble. It was an intense few days!

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  2. I really like the balance of colors in this collage; how they playfully bounce about the page. And if I'm not mistaken, I love how you ripped a shape of pink paper to complete the bottom of the dress on the foreground figure.

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    1. There were lovely colours in the calendar images which were very inspiring to combine in different ways. I did put a swatch of pinkish toned paper across the bottom, mostly to balance the composition, but I like your take on it completing the woman's dress bottom. It was fun to leave room for the imagination to complete the image or make a jump to a storyline.

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  3. That's a really beautiful series...

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    1. I'm glad you're enjoying it.

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  4. These women seem to be peacefully pondering something lying in a common direction. I wonder what. The expressions are too unconflicted for it to be a man, so I'll guess a child.

    I too ponder . . . the significance of the inverted 26.

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    1. What an interestingly astute observation about the women's expressions being too unconflicted for them to be gazing upon a man! A child is good guess but I think the gaze is also a bit too serene for that. Perhaps a small animal, like a monkey...or a unicorn. The proferring of grapes suggests they are trying to entice the creature closer. As for the inverted 26, I put it in as design element, not wanting it to be literally interpreted as having numerical significance; perhaps even having a foreign or other-worldly sort of aspect to it. You don't query the inverted T?

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  5. like the ragged edges, the faces and patterns. it all comes together beautifully

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    1. Th ragged edges are found on each collage, and I am particularly fond of that aspect myself. It's not always easy to show them in the scanned picture to blog so I'm happy that you picked up on them. The faces, all but one, were recomposed from other faces. I liked picking out various patterns that seemed to enhance one another, even sneaking a sample of wallpaper into the mix.

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  6. Lovely piece and speaks of medieval imagery only with your vision and twist! I too like the ragged edges and the colors just work! It's a rich world when your beginning intention was to let go of material and then this happened...a whole series!!

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    1. Yes, it was really like a gift, finding all this wealth waiting to be explored and exploited. Each composition just grew, the right element coming to hand...from a chaos of torn-up bits of calendar, paper, fabric, etc. strewn across my work table and all over the floor. Medieval meets modern meets madness! Glad you're enjoying the series.

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  7. In a get-together of four women spilled T is not unusual.

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    1. Especially if the women are not too straight-laced to lace the tea with a little fortification. (not naming any names here)

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